Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker and Practitioner Excellence Awards

Previous Winners

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2018

2018 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Awards

EXCELLENCE AWARD “LEGEND”

Winner - Miriam Daniels

A very proud Tiwi lady, Miriam was born at Milikapiti on the Tiwi Islands in the old health clinic managed by Aboriginal Health Workers. Miriam’s mother was a respected Elder and Senior Aboriginal Health Worker and Miriam was chosen by her family and Community to become an Aboriginal Health Worker currently known as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

Miriam has been working at the Milikapiti Health Centre for over 20 years since completing her Aboriginal Health Worker training with Batchelor College in 1997.

Miriam is and has always been an excellent role model and mentor to new and inexperienced Aboriginal Health Practitioners. She never tires of teaching and sharing her knowledge and skills, both local cultural knowledge and Western clinical skills and knowledge. Miriam is fiercely passionate about Aboriginal Health, in particular child health.

Miriam understands the cultural gap and is able to facilitate respect between cultures by articulating good communication between all team members, patients and their families. As a cultural broker, Miriam is able to communicate the cultural needs of Aboriginal staff and the community to team members and visiting staff, and define boundaries.

Miriam sets high standards of care and is quick to address things if she sees something is wrong. Miriam fosters a safe, secure and friendly working environment, and her positive attitude and behaviour is infectious with everyone around her.

New Practitioner Award

Winner – Casey Manhire

Casey is from the Ngarrindjeri Nation, South Australia. Casey was born and grew up in Darwin, the youngest of five children. Growing up, Casey learnt about Aboriginal history and developed a desire to empower people to access healthcare and to provide health education to promote better health.

Casey became a registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner in December 2016 and currently works at Danila Dilba Health Service, Palmerston.

Casey is acknowledged as working tirelessly in the clinic for the Aboriginal community which resides in and around Palmerston. Casey enjoys relationship building with clients to ensure engagement, as well as seeing people recover from their illnesses.

Casey is smart, conscientious and while still an early career Aboriginal Health Practitioner, is acknowledged as saving the lives of at least two of her patients with great clinical acumen by recognising the need for urgent medical attention. In one of these cases, avoiding the need for re-hospitalisation and in the other, leading to urgent hospitalisation with Critical Care Unit admission.

However, it is in Casey’s management of chronic disease, dealing with the many varied high risk and complex health issues of her patients and working with GPs, Registered Nurses, Aboriginal Health Practitioners and educators that she excels. As well as providing outstanding ‘first point of contact’ care, she is positive and encouraging around patient self-care and self-management and extremely positive, regularly making contact outside the clinic. She is an excellent judge of the tricky boundary between advocacy and support and being intrusive.

Casey believes being an Aboriginal Health Practitioner is an amazing and fulfilling job.

Urban Practitioner Award

Winner – Desmond Lyon

Desmond was born in Darwin, with five brothers and two sisters. Desmond did all his schooling in Darwin, at 12 years old he got his first job working in a timber yard and over the years worked in many different jobs, never really knowing what he was looking for in the workforce.

Finally in 2000 he applied to Danila Dilba for the Aboriginal Health Worker course and successfully graduated in 2002. Desmond moved his family to Tennant Creek to take up his first Aboriginal Health Practitioner position in the Barkly medical mobile service with the Department of Health.

Desmond’s job meant travelling to remote stations and communities delivering health services and it was at this point Desmond found his niche in the workforce. He has since worked in various areas within the Department including Sexual Health and Mental Health. Desmond has worked in the Mental Health space for 11 years and over the years has committed to assisting Aboriginal people to improve their health and well-being. Desmond believes it is important to provide culturally responsive care to our Aboriginal community.

Recently Desmond ran a specialist treatment clinic for non-aboriginal and Aboriginal clients. Desmond is just about to take the next step in his career and will shortly be taking up a position with the Mental Health team in Nhulunbuy.

Remote Practitioner Award

Winner - Miriam Daniels

Miriam Daniels was also presented the 2018 Legend Award. Read Miriam’s profile above.

Specialised Practitioner Award

Winner – Marjorie Lindner

Marjorie is a well-known and respected senior Arrernte woman in the Alice Springs region.

Marjorie has worked for the Mark Sheldon Remote Mental Health Team for 15 years, sharing her cultural knowledge and wisdom with colleagues and proving to be one of the foundations of development of the team and its longevity.

Marjorie has demonstrated many years of commitment and dedication in caring for numerous Aboriginal people and their families.

A clear strength is her ability to work within an NT government service while also maintaining strong relationships with non-government organisations.

Marjorie bridges the understanding of mental health for Aboriginal people and supports Western medical practitioners to understand the ongoing cultural differences and needs of their Aboriginal clients when assessing and treating mental illness.

In her role Marjorie works closely with doctors, nurses, Aboriginal health practitioners and Aboriginal community workers in remote communities.

Marjorie provides clear direction and education concerning mental health to clients, families, staff and peers.

Marjorie’s long term presence in Central Australia and within her role provides an incredibly valuable continuity of knowledge of families and community situations.

Marjorie ensures services are delivered in a culturally secure way by providing expert information within a cultural context; showing how other disciplines could work and communicate with family and clients.

2017

2017 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Awards

The 2017 ATSIHP Awards category winners were presented their awards by: Assistant Minister, Ms Ngaree Ah Kit MLA; President Elect Ms Marguerite Bowen, Rotary Club of Darwin Sunrise; Ms Frances Lawson, Australian Government Department of Health; Mr John Paterson, Chief Executive Officer, AMSANT; and Ms Erina Early, United Voice NT.

EXCELLENCE AWARD “LEGEND”

Winner – Ms Margaret Clayton

Margaret was born in Darwin and brought up on Croker Island, but her connections are from the Yanyula region.

A mother of five, Margaret entered the workforce as a receptionist at Darwin Aboriginal Legal Aid service. Margaret’s extensive career in health began in 1994 at the Danila Dilba Medical Service on Knuckey Street, Darwin where she was employed as the Coordinator for the Women’s Health Clinic and along with a number of other dedicated health staff she successfully helped establish the Gumileybirra Women’s Health Clinic.

Margaret then went on to work for the Department of Health as the Aboriginal Liaison Officer based in Renal where she spent eight years working between the Nightcliff and Royal Darwin Hospital Renal Units. It was during this time she became inspired to do further training, in particular Aboriginal Health Worker Training, which she completed through Batchelor Institute.

Following graduation and registration as an Aboriginal Health Worker, Margaret accepted a number of jobs travelling to various rural and remote Aboriginal communities across the NT and to Canberra, providing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care.

Where ever she lives and works Margaret takes her strong work ethics and values. She demonstrates a strong commitment to the health and wellbeing of everyone in the community and has been described as an iconic individual who goes above and beyond her responsibilities as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP).

Margaret says that she gets a great deal of satisfaction working as an AHP, helping Aboriginal people to obtain a better quality of life through appropriate health care. She has great passion to work with Aboriginal people in health alongside fellow medical staff, and mentors new AHPs to achieve great outcomes for the community.

Margaret works hard to support individuals and the community to participate in making decisions about their health, to take good care of themselves and to be empowered and self-determined.

Margaret has had a key role in facilitating engagement between the Gunbalanya community and the local Health Centre. In the Health Centre, as well as her clinical responsibilities, Margaret works hard to support her Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal colleagues, as well as staff engagement in the Health Centre.

In the community when Margaret sees a need she is always ready to assist. Margaret is often found participating in community fundraising events in particular she played a key role in raising funds for the Gunbalanya community laundry as well as for other special projects as they arise.

Margaret has also been involved in activities such as the men’s flour drum cooking classes, rheumatic heart disease program and mental health programs. She can often be seen cooking a meal and sharing it with her local health colleagues while asking about their health and well-being.

New Practitioner Award

Winner – Mr Hayden Williams

Hayden was born in Adelaide and grew up in picturesque Mt Barker, SA but his origins are from Melville Island.

A father of three, Hayden started his career as a builder in Wurrumiyanga, but hailing from a family of healthcare professionals, Hayden soon wanted to make a real difference to the health of the community.

After completing his training at BIITE, Hayden is involved in men’s health programs, school screenings and community health care.

Hayden says that the most satisfying aspects of his job is that he gets to work very closely with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the deep sense of kinship that comes with his work. As an AHP it is his privilege to be able to provide advice, education, treatment and ongoing care to those in need.

Remote Award Winner

Winner – Ms Margaret Clayton

Ms Margaret Clayton was also awarded the 2017 Legend Award.

Urban Award

Winner – Ms Margaret Byrne

Margaret was born in the old Darwin Hospital and has always been in the Top End. Her mother is from the Nauyui Nambiyu (Daly River) region.

A mother of three, Margaret commenced her training as an Aboriginal Health Worker in 1989 at Katherine Institute of Aboriginal Health. Driven by her passion for Aboriginal Health, Margaret has worked in many places including the Bagot Health Clinic, Danila Dilba Health Service, Maningrida Community Health Centre and the Royal Darwin Hospital.

Currently she is working at Ward 4A of Royal Darwin Hospital and says that her passion for Aboriginal Health is driven by something very close to her – a recent diagnosis of serious illness of a family member.

Specialised Award

Winner – Ms Phyllis Gorey

Phyllis Gorey was born in Alice Springs and has been in and around the town ever since. Phyllis started her practical training in 1982 and has been highly invested in healthcare since then.

She took her inspiration from a nurse and a traditional healer who played a vital role in caring for the people of the communities’ health and wellbeing. Phyllis has worked in many areas of health; as a general health practitioner within a clinic setting, in education and as a brokerage between clients and co-workers. She is currently working with the Mark Sheldon Remote Mental Health Team.

Phyllis loves working with Aboriginal people in remote communities to break down stigma that is associated with mental health and overall well-being. This has earned her a great amount of respect with her colleagues and communities.

2016

2016 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Awards

The 2016 ATSIHP category winners were presented their Awards by: Assistant Ministers Ms Ngaree Ah Kit MLA, and Mr Lawrence Costa MLA; President Jeff Borella, Rotary Club of Darwin Sunrise; Wendy Ah Chin, Australian Government Department of Health, John Paterson, Chief Executive Officer, AMSANT; and Members of United Voice NT;

EXCELLENCE AWARD “LEGEND”

Winner – Mr Jason King

Jason has been recognised as the 2016 Aboriginal Health Practitioner of the Year for excellence in the ATSIHP profession.

Jason completed his AHP qualification in 12 months and received the ‘Most Outstanding Student” award. Jason spent his early years practising as an AHP in his home community of Alpurrurulum, as well as other remote communities of Titjikala and Santa Teresa, sometimes working as a sole practitioner.

Jason was instrumental in securing management support and employment for 6 AHP trainees whilst working at Ngaanyatjarra Health Service, WA. Jason’s passion for improving the health of Indigenous people and advocating for work colleagues, individuals and the community has him participating on the Health Board, Community Corporation Board, Shire Advisory Group and Sports Committee. Jason is also on the Aboriginal Cultural Advisory Committee and CQI Clinical Governance Committee, involved in the policies and procedures at the local and wider levels.

Jason is currently the Clinic Manager at the Santa Teresa Community Health Centre, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress.

New Practitioner Award

Winner – Mr Kevin Ungwanaka

Kevin is a Western Arrernte man, born in Alice Springs, but grew up in Ntaria. Kevin commenced his AHP training in 2007, and is now proudly working as an AHP at Ntaria Health Centre, Hermannsburg, upon being registered as an AHP in 2014.

Kevin’s sheer determination, hard work and passion for health work helped him through the many hurdles he faced as a learner with English as a second language. Kevin is recognised as a role model and his contribution to the Health Centre is valuable in terms of his cultural brokerage and ability to connect with the men in the community.

Kevin has recently completed the Remote Emergency Course and is keen to participate on the on-call roster as required.

Remote Award Winner

Winner – Mr Jason King

Mr Jason King was also awarded the 2016 Legend Award winner.

Urban Award

Winner – Mr Robert Charles

Born in Alice Springs, Robbie spent most of his childhood in Ti Tree, growing up with his family and learning to speak his local language, Anmatjere. Robbie returned to Alice Springs to complete his Year 12 schooling at St Philips College and after returning home worked with the Anmatjere Council in Ti Tree.

After working as a general clinician in Ti Tree, Robbie also did a year with the Sexual Health Unit for Primary Health Care (PHC) and Congress. Robbie had a lot of family working as AHPs and had role models that inspired, trained and gave him the confidence to help his community.

More recently, over the last two to three years, Robbie has been spending much of his time as the Aboriginal Health Practitioner Coordinator – Human Logistics Coordinator. Robbie is passionate about educating others in the principles of cultural consideration in the workplace and how it impacts on clinical care.

Specialised Award

Winner – Ms Pilar Cubillo

Pilar is a well-known Larrakia woman, from large Darwin family. Pilar started her ATSIHP career at Danila Dilba Health Services in 2000 where she worked as a generalist AHW, across a variety of areas such as Women’s and Children’s Health, Acute Care, Outreach Mobile team, Chronic Disease Assessments and Plans, and Pharmacy.

In 2011, Pilar commenced as a Lecturer at Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education (BIITE) where she currently teaches across all units in Certificate IV ATSI PHC Practice, Certificate II Community Services and Certificate II Primary Heath Care. Pilar is an expert at teaching and learning practices that recognise and use Indigenous ways of learning.

As an ASTIHP lecturer Pilar is able to work across the two worlds of Indigenous cultural protocols and knowledge as well as the scientific world of western health knowledge. Pilar believes being an Aboriginal Lecturer at Batchelor is very important - as you are seen as a role model, advocate, cultural broker and mentor and as an Aboriginal person the students can better relate, creating rapport and greater learning environment for the students and lecturer.

As a lecturer, Pilar truly enjoys the two way learning and is inspired by the students as they progress through the course and achieve completion.

2015

2015 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Awards

The 2015 ATSIHP category winners were presented their Awards by: Health Minister John Elferink MLA; President Susan Penfold, Rotary Club of Darwin Sunrise; Tania McInnes, Australian Government Department of Health, John Paterson, Chief Executive Officer, AMSANT; and Erina Early, United Voice NT;

EXCELLENCE AWARD “LEGEND”

Winner – Ms Sarah Bukulatjpi

Sarah has been recognised as the 2015 Aboriginal Health Practitioner of the Year for her exemplary service and dedication to the profession.

Sarah was born in Gove, and is currently the Chronic Disease Team Leader, Ngalkanbuy Clinic, Galiwinku. Sarah had decided she wanted to become an AHP at an early age, when she would visit her mother at Ngalkanbuy clinic who worked as the Chronic Disease Aboriginal Health Worker from 1980 to 2001.

Sarah followed this dream through and did a week of work experience at the clinic when she was in Year 10. After completing Year 12, Sarah began working as a volunteer receptionist at Ngalkanbuy clinic where her mother then encouraged her to enroll in the Aboriginal Health Practitioner course at Bachelor Institute when she was 19. Sarah worked hard at completing the Certificate III Aboriginal Health Worker course in 2004.

Sarah was nominated for the ATSIHP awards because she is an extremely effective Team Leader who oversees the daily running of the Chronic Disease and Adult Health Program. She effectively delegates tasks to her nurses, Aboriginal Health Practitioners and trainees, approves timesheets, analyses data and reports on her program achievements and obstacles.

New Practitioner Award

Winner – Ms Kylie (Helen) Parry

Kylie is from Woodycupildya (past Daly River), and commenced work in Adelaide River Health Centre as a newly registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner in October 2014.

Kylie is first the Aboriginal Health Practitioner to work within the Adelaide River Health Centre in many years. The Adelaide River Township of 500 is predominately a non-Indigenous population, with 100 people identifying as Aboriginal.

The number of presentations at the Health centre from the Aboriginal community of Amangal were low. However, since Kylie has been working at the health centre, the numbers of presentations has more than doubled from 769 presentations in 2014 to 1461 in 2015.

Remote Award Winner

Winner – Ms Dianne Hampton

Dianne (Dee) is one of Katherine West’s’s longest serving staff members and a senior Aboriginal Health Practitioner working in her home communities of Kalkarindji and Daguragu (approximately 460km south-west of Katherine) since their formative days in 2001.

Dee is renowned for her skill in managing large volumes of people in rapidly changing situations, such as emergency situations, where her skill in interpreting complex health issues is highly valued. Dee’s leadership work on the Aboriginal Reference Group Committee is highly valued, as in her guidance and input with health literacy shaping the development of culturally safe health promotion resources effective program delivery at the community grass roots level. Dee’s knowledge and understanding of the local community significantly enhances the Health Centre’s ability to provide targeted health programs for individuals and families in the region.

In 2015, Dee holds our Rheumatic Heart Disease portfolio in the Health Centre, along with managing a large percentage of our sexual health contacts and follow up treatments. Dee has also been very involved in health and safety issues in her local communities. Over the years, Dee has had direct involvement in a number of initiatives, including cultural orientation, tackling smoking, trachoma and ear health treatment, child and maternal health and various specific areas of chronic disease treatment.

The quality of Dee’s work is reflected by her standing in the community, where clients frequently request Dee as their primary health care provider, emphasising their personal regard for her, alongside their faith in her clinical abilities.

Urban Award

Winner – Ms Natasha Tatipata

Natasha was born in Darwin, and completed her Aboriginal health practitioner training at Danila Dilba Health Service in 2004. Since graduating Natasha has worked in the area of Women’s Health and Primary Health Care and then had an opportunity to work in the area of Sexual health and has done so for the past nine years.

Natasha is currently working for the Department of Health at Clinic 34, Sexual Health and Blood Borne Virus Unit, being the only Aboriginal Health Practitioner at Clinic 34. Natasha has provided her colleagues with valuable insight and information to facilitate the provision of a service which is culturally appropriate for Aboriginal clients.

Natasha is very passionate in the promotion of sexual health and education to the Aboriginal youth population in Darwin and ensuring that this is done in a culturally appropriate manner. Natasha has a particular strength in attaining the confidence of her clients and ensuring a safe environment and is the preferred clinician to provide services to regular clients.

Specialised Award

Winner – Ms Sarah Bukulatjpi

Ms Sarah Bukulatjpi was also awarded the 2015 Legend Award winner.

2014

2014 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Awards

Our winners and highly commended individuals were presented their Awards by: Health Minister Robyn Lambley MLA; President Ian Berry, Rotary Club of Darwin Sunrise; Wendy Ah Chin, Executive Director, Aboriginal Health Policy & Engagement, Department of Health; John Paterson, Chief Executive Officer, AMSANT; and Matthew Gardiner, Secretary United Voice NT;

EXCELLENCE AWARD “LEGEND”

Winner – Colleen Kantilla, Julanimawu Clinic, Bathurst Island, Tiwi Islands

Colleen was born in 1962 on the Tiwi Islands in the local community of Wurrumiyanga. Colleen went to the small local missionary school under the tutorage of the nuns. She first started working as a 16 year old as a Hospital Assistant and then commenced a course in Aboriginal Health Workers Basic Skills.

Throughout her career spanning over 30 years Colleen has maintained her clinical skills keeping up to date with new technologies and clinical practice. Colleen continues her passion caring for her community, and keeping up her clinical abilities and most recently assisted in the delivery of a baby.

Colleen’s work colleagues say that she is an exceptional Health Practitioner, highly respected, passionate, displays great strength and ability to stay commitment and positive. Colleen says “sometimes I feel tired and not feeling well, I don’t want to give up my work, I love my job!”

New Practitioner Award

Winner – Linda Pupangamirri, Julanimawu Clinic, Bathurst Island, Tiwi Islands

Linda is a strong Tiwi woman, and is a role model for her community working at Julanimawu Health Centre.

Linda’s career in health began approximately 10 years ago as a Pharmacy Technician. Linda managed the Pharmacy at Julanimawu Health Centre with remote support from a private pharmacist. Linda is a new graduate of the Certificate IV in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Practice qualification. Linda has been employed in her community in various positions.

Since completing her training Linda works in the Julanimawu Health Centre providing health services such as child health, acute care also participating in on-call emergency. Linda is passionate and committed to her work and demonstrates outstanding achievements as a new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner. Linda has a thirst for learning new skills and is committed about participating in other health programs.

Her local community, the health clinic and overall health team is very proud of Linda and has been described as having impeccable work ethics.

Remote Award Winner

Winner – Colleen Kantilla, Julanimawu Clinic, Bathurst Island, Tiwi Islands

Colleen was born in 1962 on the Tiwi Islands in the local community of Wurrumiyanga. Colleen went to the small local missionary school under the tutorage of the nuns. She first started working as a 16 year old as a Hospital Assistant and then commenced a course in Aboriginal Health Workers Basic Skills.

Throughout her career spanning over 30 years Colleen has maintained her clinical skills keeping up to date with new technologies and clinical practice. Colleen continues her passion caring for her community, and keeping up her clinical abilities and most recently assisted in the delivery of a baby.

Colleen’s work colleagues say that she is an exceptional Health Practitioner, highly respected, passionate, displays great strength and ability to stay commitment and positive. Colleen says “sometimes I feel tired and not feeling well, I don’t want to give up my work, I love my job!”

Highly Commended – Jeremy Downes, Yuendumu Clinic, Central Australia

Jeremy commenced his training as a clinical Aboriginal Health Worker at Danila Dilba in 2000. In 2002 Jeremy moved to remote health on the Tiwi Islands then was transferred to Central Australia in 2009 where he has worked as a Health Practitioner. He is a Justice of the Peace and up until recently he was , for many years a carer for a disabled Person.

He is one of the Senior Health Practitioner at the Yuendumu Health Clinic and works with visiting health services. He has also taken on call duties and often acts as Centre Manager at the Yuendumu clinic.

Jeremy is recognised as a positive role model within his profession, his peers and his community members. He promotes his role positively and is passionate about his work in Yuendumu Health Clinic.

Jeremy has often mentioned that “he would like to see more male community members trained as Aboriginal Health Practitioners to tackle the problems associated with the many of our men’s health problems.

Urban Award

Winner – Cynthia Brock, Danila Dilba, Aboriginal Medical Services

Cynthia was born in Darwin, married to Tom, has three children and eight grandchildren.

Cynthia completed her qualification in 2005. She currently works at Danila Dilba Aboriginal Medical Services. She is one of two Specialist Diabetic Coordinators working in the Chronic Disease Care Coordination Team which has responsibilities for providing services to local Nursing Homes with a General Practitioner. Cynthia is also a mentor to staff at Danila Dilba.

She encourages her clients to keep appointments and maintain good health. She demonstrates great sensitivities with brief interventions and motivational discussions and is vigilant about immunisations.

Cynthia’s professional colleagues describe her as an example of a great team player, who is multi-talented and is excellent to work with. Over time she has also built up trust and respect with her clients.

Cynthia says her biggest motivation for becoming an aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner “was wanting to help her father who was a diabetic, and to help her fellow countrymen; and to be a role model for her children”.

Highly Commended – Kym Stanton, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

Kym worked as an Administrator and Customer Service Officer with the Institute for Aboriginal Development in Central Australia before deciding to become an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

In 2012 Kym won two awards as a New Practitioner, the Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Award and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association. That same year Kym completed her training as an Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner and is now a very important team member in her local service.

Kym has worked across many programs at Congress and is currently acting as a senior Aboriginal Health Practitioner working alongside the Clinic Manager within a structured mentoring program with the goal of taking over as Practice Manager within three years. She is also a member of the Hearing Health Team where she assists in otoscopy, distraction testing and explaining the results to families. She also provides education information to the families about ear health and the importance hearing has on learning language.

Kym mentions that in the future she would like to see our ATSIHP workforce grow and strengthen as Health Practitioners are vital members of every Aboriginal Medical Service and community clinics.

Specialised Award

Winner – Elaine Campbell, Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

Elaine Campbell is Luritja and Arrerente woman born in Alice Springs.

In 2000, Elaine worked at the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress as an Aboriginal Liaison Officer and later commenced her Aboriginal Health Worker training completing this in 2004.

Elaine says that she “chose to be an Aboriginal Health Worker because she and her families have long standing relationship with the Congress Health Centre and have always felt the need to assist our struggling Aboriginal health status”.

In 2006, she was asked by her manager to assist in the running of the Frail, Aged and Disabled program. Elaine mentions that her confidence has grown whilst working in this program as a sole provider.

She said “she feel the need to improve the health of the Aboriginal people in Central Australia so that we can ‘Close the Gap’ of Aboriginal life expectancy for our future generations”.

Highly Commended – David Cox, Primary Health Care Team Outreach, Darwin

David was born in Alice Springs and has followed a family tradition of working in the health profession. David became an Aboriginal Health Worker in 2002 working in the Alice Springs Hospital.

David moved to Darwin in 2011 where he worked across many Top End communities in the Primary Health Care Outreach Team, and Child Health Nurse’s in the Healthy School Age Kids Program.

In 2012, David was appointed to a Male Health Coordinator position in the Primary Health Care Outreach Team providing essential health services to male youth and men in Top End communities. He continues to maintain and build relationships with men discussing health issues, and also promoting the Young Men’s Community Education Program working closely with the Adolescent Sexuality Project Officers.

In 2013, David initiated the first inaugural Men’s Camp for youth in Borroloola combining culture and healthy lifestyle education with a focus on nutrition and disease prevention.

David’s colleagues say he is well respected and highly regarded and often seek his advice.

ALL 2014 FINALISTS & HIGHLY COMMENDED

  • Cynthia Brock - Danila Dilba Aboriginal Medical Services, Darwin
  • Elaine Campbell - Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, Alice Springs
  • David Cox - Primary Health Care Team Outreach Top End West Darwin
  • Jeremy Downs - Yuendumu Clinic Central Australian
  • Sarah Gallagher - Utju Clinic Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, Alice Springs
  • Joseph Gideon Pangiraminni - Pirilangimpi Clinic Melville Island
  • Phyllis Gorey - CA Mental Health Team
  • Colleen Kantilla - Julanimawu Clinic, Bathurst Island, Tiwi Islands
  • Marjorie Lindner - CA Mental Health Team
  • Linda Pupangamirri - Julanimawu Clinic, Bathurst Island Tiwi Islands
  • Kym Stanton - Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, Alice Springs

CERTIFICATE of ENCOURAGEMENT

  • Dawn Daly - Batchelor Institute of Tertiary Education, Darwin
  • Tony Duggie - Canteen Creek Clinic Central Australian Primary Health Care Services

2013

2013 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Awards

Our winners and highly commended individuals were presented their Awards by: Prof. Dinesh Arya, Chief Medical Officer of Department of Health; Di Borella, Rotary Club of Darwin Sunrise; John Paterson, Chief Executive Officer, AMSANT; Matthew Gardiner, Secretary United Voice NT;  and Health Minister Robyn Lambley MLA.

EXCELLENCE AWARD “LEGEND”

Winner – Joyce Bohme, Maningrida Health Centre

Joyce works at the Maningrida Health Centre. Joyce has been a registered Aboriginal Health Worker for 25 years in the Maningrida Health Centre. Joyce is a role model for her community. She works as a sole practitioner and also works in larger teams as required. She shows empathy and expresses genuine concern for her people. Joyce is dependable and when resources are not equitable across the board she has often gets in there and does the work. Joyce has a warm smile and always welcoming her community members and visitors to her health centre and community. She always shares knowledge and experiences/difficulties and likes to interact with other health workers. Joyce states that her biggest achievement is becoming an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

New Practitioner Award

Winner – Emslie Lankin, Hermannsberg Primary Health Care Centre

Emslie Lankin is a new practitioner and a Western Aranda woman from the Ntaria (Hermannsburg) community 126km west from Alice Springs. Emslie commenced her training in 2010 at Central Australian Aboriginal Congress where she was able to complete her clinical preparation. She became registered under AHPRA in October 2012 and is now employed by Central Australia Remote Health.

Emslie was inspired and encouraged to become an Aboriginal Health Practitioner by a male Elder from her community, who was an Aboriginal Health Worker in the past.he worked in the same clinic Naria some 30 years ago, he saw great potential in Emslie. He was a great source of encouragement to Emslie, and see her as a great role model to your community.

Remote Award Winner

Winner – Joyce Bohme, Maningrida Health Clinic

Joyce is nominated for the remote category and works at the Maningrida Health Centre. Joyce has been a registered Aboriginal Health Worker for 25 years in the Maningrida Health Centre.

Joyce is a role model for her community. She works as a sole practitioner and also works in larger teams as required. She shows empathy and expresses genuine concern for her people.

Joyce is dependable and when resources are not equitable across the board she has often gets in there and does the work.

Joyce has a warm smile and always welcoming her community members and visitors to her health centre and community.

She always shares knowledge and experiences/difficulties and likes to interact with other health workers.

Joyce states that her biggest achievement is becoming an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

Highly Commended – Jo Appo, Elliott Health Clinic

Di Borella, Rotary Club of Darwin Sunrise presenting Jo Appo with the Highly Commended Award in the Remote category.

Josephine (Jo) as she is known was nominated for the remote category and works at Elliott Health Clinic. Jo is well known for her professionalism as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner and for a person who always uphold the ethics and expectations of her career choice. Jo is a role model within her profession and is always providing positive advice and direction to other members of her health team. Jo is well respected member of her team and always willing to share her expertise

Urban Award

Winner – Dorothy Butler, Wurli Wurlinjang Health Service

Dorothy is currently the Eye Health Coordinator with the Wurli-Wurlinjang Health Service. Dorothy identifies as a Jawoyn lady from the Katherine Region.

Dorothy is a well-recognised and respected role model across all the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner profession.  Her expertise and experience in the eye health area is well regarded and she is regularly called on to train new trainees.
In 2007, Dorothy was also awarded the Katherine NAIDOC Elder of the year for her commitment to improving services for her people. In 2013, Dorothy was awarded the Katherine NAIDOC Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of her 40 plus years of Health care in the Katherine Region.  
Dorothy draws on her experience of 40 plus years in the health sector and is often called upon for her knowledge and skill in Aboriginal Health.

Highly Commended – Dwayne Pearce, Intensive Care Unit at Alice Springs Hospital.

Dwayne, is an Aboriginal Health Practitioner who works in Intensive Care Unit in Alice Springs Hospital. Dwayne has been in the unit for 4 years. Dwayne is the interface between non-Aboriginal staff and patients in the Intensive Care Unit in Alice Springs Hospital, He is described as indispensable in his role as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner in the Intensive Care Unit providing a valuable service to staff and Aboriginal community members who are admitted or visit the unit.

He is often brings comfort to the patients, the male patients in particular appreciate his presence as part of the team and is always happy to assist with Men’s health issues.

Specialised Award

Winner – Rhonda Simon, Numbulwar Health Clinic

Rhonda works at Numbulwar Health Clinic as the Aboriginal Health Practitioner expert in the speciality area of Child Health for the past 4 years in her community. Rhonda is well recognised as a role model for her profession and in the field of child health.

Rhonda has a special ability and respect to be able to work across all sectors of her community and the East Arnhem Regional.

Highly Commended – Alicia Ross, Don Dale Centre at Berrimah Prison

Alicia Ross is an exceptionally skilled Aboriginal Health Practitioner who works in the Don Dale Centre in Berrimah. Alicia provides health care treatment and assessments to the youth who reside at Don Dale Centre. Alicia is passionate about her work and provides a high level of professional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner service in her everyday work in the centre.

Alicia’s health work involving treatment and care with and to the youth in the detention centre environment often reported as very positive way that she speaks to them and often her positiveness is seen flowing onto many of the youth presenting for care.

ALL 2013 FINALISTS

  • Dwayne Pearce – Intensive Care Unit, Alice Springs Hospital
  • Jo Appo – Elliott Health Clinic
  • Joyce Bohme – Maningrida Health Clinic
  • Dorothy Butler – Wurli Wilinijang Health Service
  • Pilar Cubillo – Batchelor Institute
  • Lynette O’Bree – Alukura Health Clinic, Alice Springs
  • Jeremy Downes – Yuendumu Health Clinic
  • Emslie Lankin – Hermannsburg Primary Health Care Centre
  • Alicia Ross – Don Dale Centre, Berrimah Prison
  • Rhonda Simon – Numbulwar Health Clinic
  • Marisa Smiler-Cairns – Wurli Wilinijang Health Service

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Last updated: 21 June 2019