Introduction

An alcohol management plan is an agreement to tackle the harm caused by alcohol abuse in a way that works for the community. It must have a strong focus on reducing alcohol-related harm and improving community safety, particularly for women and children.

The plan is developed in partnership with the community and with support from local organisations and government staff. It must be agreed to by the community and government.

Alcohol management plans employ an integrated approach with supply, demand and harm reduction strategies.

They aim to minimise the nature and extent of harm caused by the excessive consumption of alcohol.

Alcohol management plans recognise that alcohol problems are not the same in every part of the Territory. Communities have different priorities that require different solutions, with strategies being tailored to meet local conditions and circumstances.

Definitions

Supply reduction refers to reducing alcohol consumption and related harm by managing the availability, accessibility and convenience of alcohol supply.

Demand reduction refers to changing individual attitudes, personal knowledge and behaviours to drinking alcohol. It also looks at changing the community’s tolerance of irresponsible and risky drinking patterns.

Harm reduction refers to influencing safer drinking choices and drinking environments to reduce harm to individuals and the community through the provision of interventions that prevent further harm.

Alcohol reference groups

Local alcohol reference groups agree on the strategies and since off on the alcohol management plan at the local level. The groups are made up of stakeholders like:

  • community members
  • policy
  • health representatives
  • government representatives
  • alcohol and other drug services representatives
  • businesses 
  • licensees.

There are alcohol reference groups (ARGs) across a range of NT communities.

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Last updated: 28 November 2017